Tag: Aging

Welcome to the Club

On February 27 my Dad died, and I became a member of a club I had avoided for 63 years. I know hundreds, maybe even thousands of members of this club and have walked with many of them on their journey through the loss of a parent.

Senior Games

In January, my singing partner Cindy Ballaro asked me if I’d ever heard of the Senior Games or the Silver Arts competition. I had not heard of either one.  

Myths & Facts about Hospices

As a Strategic Account Manager for Hospice & Palliative Care Charlotte Region I like to start many of my educational in-services and community events with a question: “What do you think of when you hear the word ‘hospice’?”  As you can imagine, depending on the crowd I receive a multitude of answers to that question.  Based on these answers I wanted to share some of the most common hospice myths and misconceptions that our staff must overcome when educating the Charlotte community about end of life care.

Money Follows the Person Changes Lives

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that helps Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities (e.g., nursing homes, intermediate care facilities) move into their own homes and communities with supports.

Home Care Activities for People with Dementia

Cognitive health is a person’s ability to think, learn and remember. The most common cognitive health issue facing the elderly is the loss of those cognitive functions, or dementia.

Becoming a Person with True Integrity

A new year brings new opportunities and fresh starts!  Most of us make a list of New Year’s resolutions.  We start out great, but by March, what a different story! 

Asset Protection & Medicaid Eligibility: Part 2, Single Individuals

When the need for long-term care arises, most people fear that they cannot afford to privately pay the cost of a skilled nursing facility, yet assume that they make too much money or have too many assets to qualify for long-term care Medicaid. 

Diabetes and Stress

Stress has been proven to instigate changes in blood sugar levels. For people with diabetes, this can be problematic.

What is the latest in Alzheimer’s treatment?

Alzheimer’s disease remains the most common form of dementia. In the United States, there are currently an estimated 5.5 million Americans living with this disease, and if there are no disease modifying drugs developed, it may increase to 16 million by 2050.